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POSITIONAL NYSTAGMUS ON CLINICAL OR ENG TESTING

Timothy C. Hain, MD Page last modified: February 17, 2011

This page is an attempt to organize positional nystagmus by it's ENG findings, rather than point out what kind of positional nystagmus occurs in various disorders.

Upbeating Positional Nystagmus (UPN)

UPN indicates upbeating nystagmus elicited by lying supine, generally with the head tilted to one or the other side (the Dix-Hallpike). It is generally accompanied by geotropic torsion, and due to posterior canal BPPV.   See this page for an ENG positive for BPPV.

Downbeating Positional Nystagmus (DPN)

DPN indicates downbeating nystagmus elicited by lying supine. Generally it doesn't matter if the head is tilted to the side -- it works in any position. This is generally unaccompanied by torsion, and is due to anterior canal BPPV.

Lateral Positional Nystagmus (LPN)

LPN refers to side-beating nystagmus elicited by lying supine, and not modulated to any great extent by turning the head to one side or the other. This nystagmus is of usually of uncertain origin, but reasonable possibilities include central positional nystagmus syndromes.

Direction changing positional nystagmus (DCPN)

The term DCPN is always used to refer to a horizontal nystagmus that changes direction, while the person is supine, depending on whether the person's head is turned to the right or left. This nystagmus is generally due to lateral canal BPPV. It can also be central or be an insufficiently characterized cervical nystagmus.

The term DCPN does NOT refer to the nystagmus seen on sitting.

For example, when people have PC BPPV, their nystagmus does reverse on sitting -- it becomes downbeating for about 10 seconds. This is very common.

In theory, people with anterior canal BPPV should have DBN on supine, and UBN on sitting. 

In persons with lateral canal BPPV, the lateral canal is tilted in the head so debris can roll one way when they are down, and another way when they are sitting.

Bitorsional nystagmus (BTN)

This refers to a twisting of the eyes elicited by having the person lie supine. It is nearly always geotropic -- twisting so that the fast phase is downward in space.

The origin of this common pattern is unclear. It is sometimes seen in persons with pontine injuries, sometimes in persons with bilateral BPPV, and most comonly in persons with Migraine associated vertigo.

Cervical Nystagmus (CVN)

There are several movies concerning cervical vertigo on the site DVD.

Cervical vertigo basically means dizziness that is a function of the position of the head on the trunk (i.e. neck). Cervical nystagmus is a nystagmus that always goes the same direction no matter how the head is oriented to gravity.

The "core" test for cervical vertigo is called the "vertebral artery test".  It is nothing complex - -with the person sitting upright, just turn the head to the end of rotation on the trunk, hold it there long enough (about 20 seconds), and look for nystagmus (with the eye in the center, in complete darkness).  The PT literature talks quite a bit about this test, as a screen for vertebral artery disease (it doesn't do this very well).  However, the procedure itself may produce nystagmus -- usually it is weak and beats directed towards the direction of head rotation. Most people with this pattern have a herniated cervical disk.  This is most commonly associated with a herniated disk around C5, and is diagnostic of diskogenic cervical vertigo.

Occasionally it is strong and beats in some other direction. Most people with this pattern are undiagnosed, but their symptoms are attributed to vertebral artery compression anyway.

You might wonder why people with the strong nystagmus are usually undiagnosed - -the reason is that radiologists are reluctant to turn the head far enough to one side -- perhaps because they are afraid of a stroke and being sued - -so there is a "catch 22" with this particular syndrome.

There are numerous variants of this simple procedure that are much harder to interpret.  Perhaps they are valuable, but usually they simply seem to muddy the water.

Method #1 -- compare supine head-R and head-L with prone head-R and head-L.  Cervical should stay the same, ear or brain should "flip".
Method #2 -- compare supine head-R and head-L with body R and body L.  Cervical should go away with body
Method #3 -- have the person sit on a swivel chair, hold their head still, and have them rotate their body under the head.  Any nystagmus here should be cervical.

Practically -- I have discarded most of these methods in favor of the simple and straightforward procedure that I first listed.

Positional Nystagmus
Copyright October 6, 2013 , Timothy C. Hain, M.D. All rights reserved. Last saved on October 6, 2013